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August 18, 2022

Writer John Logan On Directing They/Them And Penning Gladiator, Penny Dreadful, And More – Exclusive Interview

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The film wasn’t quite what I expected. I went into it thinking it was a “slasher flick,” which it is, but the real horror is what’s happening at camp on a day-to-day basis. How did you come up with the idea of ​​doing it in a gay conversion camp?

I wanted to write a queer empowerment film. I’ve loved horror movies since I was six years old and growing up I can remember that gay characters mostly didn’t exist. If they existed at all, even in coded form, they were jokes or victims or murderers – they were never the hero. I know how much it would have meant to see a queer hero in a horror movie, so I wanted to do it. I wanted to create a context for that.

I had met some people who had gone through something called conversion therapy and they told me about their experiences that stuck with me. These are often camps in very remote areas. It occurred to me that the isolated camp in the wilderness is the main character of the slasher film – and I love slasher films. I make no apologies for loving slasher movies and it seemed to me that it was a good framework to complete this weird empowering drama.

As you said, the slasher movie elements are part of the horror. This is the fear of jumping, the tension [and] the mass murder, but the real, true horror is the psychological warfare being waged on these children to try and get them to deny their queer identity.

Why is Peacock the right place for this?

First of all, Peacock was fantastic from start to finish. It’s my first time directing and I was fully supported by Blumhouse and Peacock. I needed more rehearsal time because I had never done it before. I needed more filming time and they were so generous.

Peacock is a very pro-queer network. They are very open to alternative stories like Queer As Folk. They are very open to telling stories that the mainstream might shy away from. A gay empowerment film set in a conversion camp wouldn’t be for everyone, but Peacock was into it from the start, I think because he was different. It was one of a kind and when you look at what Peacock has to offer there is always a quality of uniqueness that to me is very special and very rare.



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