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What Really Went On Behind The Scenes Of Chicago Fire’s My Lucky Day Episode

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In the TV industry, a bottle sequence was originally defined as part of a show shot with the bare minimum of sets, actors, and camera angles to save on production costs (via Studio Binder).

As it turns out, bottling “My Lucky Day” was indeed a money-saving move by One Chicago executives in early 2021 due to rising costs related to COVID-19, but it was also a way to showcase the company’s dramatic acting skills actors involved. In fact, Reza Tabrizi, the episode’s director, was also the cinematographer on “Chicago Fire” and gave him insight into the use of the nine cameras and six GoPro units used during the shoot.

Speaking to The Hollywood Reporter, showrunner Derek Haas explained, “The challenge of this episode was essentially playing five acts in a freight elevator.” Since they wanted the performances to be as engaging and impactful as possible, he went on to say, ” we had the actors learn the acts as if it were a play… so we had these takes that were 25 minutes long where normally it’s three or four minutes.” The result is that the My Lucky Day Episode of “Chicago Fire” presented as a theatrical stage production, with full focus on the four actors turning a stalled elevator into a supercharged pressure cooker of interpersonal drama and suspense.



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