Unsafe Driving Of Teenagers Due To Use Of Phones While Driving

Unsafe Driving Of Teenagers Due To Use Of Phones While Driving

When it comes to young drivers, one dangerous driving behavior might lead to other dangerous driving behaviors on the road. According to a new study, people who use cell phones while driving are more likely to participate in other sorts of unsafe driving.

Unsafe Driving Of Teenagers Due To Use Of Phones While Driving

This study found that frequent mobile use while driving was only one indicator of a more general pattern of risky driving practices associated with prior crashes in young drivers, said study author Elizabeth Walshe, a research scientist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) (CHOP).

Unsafe Driving Of Teenagers Due To Use Of Phones While Driving

Assessing personality qualities like impulsivity and sensation-seeking may be useful in identifying drivers who are most at risk to deliver more focused treatments encouraging safe driving, Walshe stated in a hospital news release.

According to the researchers, the findings imply that initiatives to promote safe driving in teenagers and young adults should address all forms of dangerous driving related to impulsivity.

Their study included 384 young drivers (years 18-24) from around the United States who completed an online survey assessing their risky driving habits, as well as their collision history and impulse-related personality factors.

Approximately 44 percent of the drivers indicated they’d been in at least one accident, and 73 percent admitted to using their cellphones while driving.

Those who used their telephones while driving were more likely to report unsafe driving behaviors such as speeding, aggressive passing, and running red lights.

According to research published recently in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, while smartphone usage when driving was not specifically connected with collisions, it was one of the numerous dangerous behaviors connected with crashes.

It may be advantageous to regard cellphone usage while driving as part of a set of dangerous driving behaviors, such as driving while intoxicated, study co-author Dan Romer, research director at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Center and a senior fellow at CIRP, stated.

Teens’ immaturity behind the wheel makes them more vulnerable to distraction. One in three teen texters admits to doing so while driving. 

According to research, dialing a phone number while driving raises a teen’s chance of crashing by six times, while texting while driving raises the risk by 23 times. Talking or texting on the phone diverts teen’s attention away from the task of driving, reducing their capacity to react to road danger, incidents, or adverse weather.

Distracted driving may manifest itself in a variety of ways other than texting and chatting on the phone. Many teenagers may attempt to utilize their driving time to eat breakfast or sip coffee, apply cosmetics, or change the radio station. The addition of passengers in the car distracts many teenagers. Any distraction is a risky distraction. Taking the eyes off the road for even five seconds might result in a fatality.

 Parents should discuss with their teens the rules and responsibilities of driving. They should share some data and tales about young drivers and distracted driving and remind them regularly that driving is a skill that needs the driver’s undivided attention. Text messages and phone calls may wait till he or she arrives at his or her destination.

Parents should familiarize themselves with the state’s graded driver’s license law and make sure that the adolescent follows it. Also, they should c Check the state’s distracted driving regulations; several jurisdictions include beginner driver provisions in their distracted driving statutes. If necessary, parents should make their own rules.

Guardians should set penalties for inattentive driving. If their kid violates a distraction rule they’ve established, parents should consider suspending their driving privileges, restricting the hours they can drive, or restricting the areas they may drive. Parents may also consider restricting a teen’s access to their mobile phone—a penalty that, in today’s society, kids may see as serious.

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