High Intake Of Sugary Drinks Increases The Risk Of Colon Cancer In Young Women

High Intake Of Sugary Drinks Increases The Risk Of Colon Cancer In Young Women

Colon cancer is becoming more common in young Americans, and a recent report indicates that consuming too many sweet beverages might be blamed, at least in women.

High Intake Of Sugary Drinks Increases The Risk Of Colon Cancer In Young Women

Women who drank more than two sugary drinks a day, such as cold drinks, juices, or energy drinks, had a twofold increased chance of developing colon cancer by the age of 50, relative to women who drank one or fewer sugary drinks a week.

High Intake Of Sugary Drinks Increases The Risk Of Colon Cancer In Young Women

In addition to the well-known negative metabolic and health effects of sugar-sweetened drinks, his observations have added another justification to stop them, according to study author Yin Cao who is an associate professor of surgery at Washington School of Medicine in Saint Louis.

About 95,000 women from the current Nurses Health Survey were included in the study. When the research started in 1989, the nurses ranged in age from 25 to 42, and they collected diet details every four years for almost 25 years.

41,272 of those surveyed commented on what and how much they drank as teenagers. 109 women developed colon cancer by the age of 50 in a study that lasted 24 years.

Even after researchers accounted for other factors that may influence colon cancer risk, such as family background, having a greater consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in adulthood was correlated with a higher risk of the disease. This risk increased as women drank sodas and other sugary beverages during their adolescence.

According to the report, every single consumption in adulthood was connected to a 16% increased risk of colon cancer; however, when women were 13 to 18, any beverage was linked to a 32% higher chance of contracting colon cancer before the age of 50.

However, replacing sugar-sweetened foods with chemically sweetened drinks, chocolate, or milk was associated with a 17 percent to 36 percent lower risk of developing colon cancer by the age of 50, according to the report.

Cao believes that limiting sugar-sweetened soda use and/or replacing sugar-sweetened drinks with other balanced beverages will be a safer and smarter option for long-term wellbeing.

The new research was not intended to determine how, or even whether, drinking sugary drinks increases the risk of colon cancer, although several hypotheses do exist. People who drink sugary drinks are more likely to be overweight or obese, and to have type 2 diabetes, both of which increase the chance of developing early-onset colon cancer. Cao believes that the high-fructose corn syrup in these beverages can also contribute to the growth of colon cancer.

The study does have some drawbacks. Since the participants were all white women, the results do not extend to men or women of other races.

Researchers who were not interested in the current research are keen to point out that only a correlation was found and that more evidence is required to draw conclusive conclusions regarding the involvement of sugary drinks in causing early-onset colon cancer.

Dr. Will Bulsiewicz, a gastroenterologist in Mount Pleasant in South Carolina, said that more evidence is required before they can give this a seal of approval and state with certainty that this correlation is truly causation. Nobody believes that sugar-sweetened drinks are good for one’s health, and one should limit the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages as much as possible.

An assistant professor, Dr. Patricio Polanco, with the division of surgical oncology in the department of surgery, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, acknowledged this and said that sugar-sweetened drinks are linked to a variety of other disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes. There is growing evidence that could also be linked to colon cancer.

It is unclear why colon cancer is becoming more common in younger people. Higher rates of obesity and potentially increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages also play a role. He mentioned that there could be a genetic contribution that has yet to be identified.

Polanco emphasized that the only way to defend one’s body from colon cancer is to get routine screenings.

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